Fachgebiet Molekulare Genetik

Prof. Dr. Zuzana Storchová

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-3250
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: storchova[at]biologie.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-103

Consulting hours: Wednesday 11:00 - 12:00
CV

Ingeborg Heiduk, Secretary

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-4273
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: Ingeborg.Heiduk[at]biologie.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-105

Office hours:

Tuesday and Wednesday morning
Monday and Thursday afternoon
Friday morning (even weeks)


Dr. Markus Räschle, Project Leader

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-4269
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: raeschle[at]bio.uni-kl.de
CV
Room: 24-138B

 

Project description:

Our group uses cutting-edge mass spectrometry to study DNA repair processes. We comprehensively monitor the assembly of DNA repair complexes on chromatin as it undergoes replication and repair in Xenopus egg extracts. From the proteomic profiles we identify novel factors with potential roles in DNA repair and the maintenance of genome stability. Using a variety of biochemical and cell biological assays we try to pinpoint their precise function during the repair process.
Over the past years this approach has reveal several new genome stability factors with important functions in the repair of psoralen crosslinks. By covering additional DNA repair pathways we aim at obtaining a system-wide view of DNA repair.


 

Dr. Prince Saforo Amponsah, Postdoctoral Fellow

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-4385
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: amponsah[at]bio.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-101

 

 

Project description:

Normal human cells possess diploid copies (2n) of each chromosome. The presence of an abnormal copy number, either through acquisition or loss of chromosome(s), is termed aneuploidy – a hallmark of cancer. One consequence of aneuploidy is proteotoxic stress, due to altered protein homeostasis, which may be resolved by upregulation of autophagy. However, it is not entirely clear which proteins are autophagized in aneuploid cells. My research project aims to address this question.


 

 

Andrea Tirincsi

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-5920
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: tirincsi[at]bio.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-109

 

Project description:

Stefan Redel - PhD Student

Tel. +49 (0)631-205-5920
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: redel[at]bio.uni-kl.de
Raum: 24-109

 

Project description:

Dastin Langner - PhD Student

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-5920
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: dlangner(at)rhrk.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-109

 

Project description:

Aneuploid cells, meaning cells with an aberrant chromosome number, usually show proliferation defects in vitro compared to euploid cells with a natural set of chromosomes. However, aneuploid phenotypes show an adapted behavior regarding the proliferation rate under selective conditions of a stressful and frequently changing environment, as is the case in cancer. My goal is to investigate which adaptations aneuploid and especially monosomic cells undergo in order to be able to outgrow healthy, euploid cells and what specific vulnerabilities or resistances are associated with them.

Karen Barthel - PhD Student

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-5919
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: kbarthel[at]bio.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-101A

 

Project description:

Healthy human cells have a diploid set of chromosomes and alterations are rarely tolerated. However, aneuploidy – an aberrant chromosome number – is a hallmark of cancer. In laboratory strains proliferation defects occur as a consequence of both gains (polyploidy) as well as losses (monosomy) of chromosomes. Yet, some cellular phenotypes seem to differ dependent on ploidy status and identity of the specific chromosome. My research focuses on the cellular consequences of monosomy as well as identifying factors that allow proliferation after chromosome loss.

Angela Wieland - PhD Student

Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-5919
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: awieland(at)rhrk.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-101A

 

Project description:

Genomic stability is maintained by complete replication and faithful segregation of each chromosome to the daughter cells. Replication stress is not only detectable during interphase but also during mitosis, where chromosomal abnormalities can give rise to persistent junctions between sister chromatids. A failure to resolve linked chromatids severely affects chromosomal segregation and stability. In my project I´m using proteomic approaches to study mitotic DNA repair processes.

Kristina Keuper - PhD Student

Tel.:+49 (0)631-205-5920
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: kkeuper(at)rhrk.uni-kl.de
Room: 24-109

 

Project description:

DNA replication is a highly regulated process essential for cellular proliferation. Replication stress characterized by stalling and collapsing replication forks causes DNA damage and may initiate tumorigenesis. Interestingly, chromosome missegregation that results in so called aneuploidy, or abnormal chromosome numbers, can also lead to replication stress. My research focuses on the replication changes in aneuploid human cells. 

Jan-Eric Bökenkamp - PhD Student

Tel. +49 (0)631-205-5920
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: boekenka[at]biologie.uni-kl.de
Raum: 24-109

 

Project description:

Chromosomal copy number aberrations are a well-established hallmark of cancer cells. Yet, adding extra chromosomes to cells in-vitro often has an initially detrimental effect on cell survival and proliferation. Through statistical analysis of data from various models of evolving cells with altered chromosome numbers, I aim to derive robust and comprehensive characterizations of multi-omic changes that facilitate the tolerance and adaption to aneuploidy.

 

Leah Johnson - PhD Student

Tel. +49 (0)631-205-5920
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email:
Raum: 24-109

 

Project description:

Aneuploidy, a karyotype characterized by the uneven gain or loss of whole chromosomes or regions of chromosomes, is frequently observed in cancer. My project aims to engineer a complete trisomy collection in near-diploid cancer cell lines using Microcell-Mediated Chromosome Transfer (MMCT). The trisomic cells will be analyzed by  transcriptomics and proteomics, and by phenotypic characterization, to identify the changes caused by the gain of a chromosome. The trisomy collection cell lines will serve as a tool to better understand why certain chromosomes are gained more frequently than the others in cancer.

 

 

Bachelor Students

Constantin Grisam

Celina Hirschelmann

 

Master Students

Carolin Erler

Anna-Luisa Hertel

 

 


Technical Staff

M.Sc. Robin Roth
Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-5921
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: rroth(at)rhrk.uni-kl.de
Room 24-107

Isabell Kirchner
Tel.: +49 (0)631-205-5921
Fax: +49 (0)631-205-4090
Email: isabell.kirchner(at)bio.uni-kl.de
Room 24-107

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